How to Draw Symmetrical Eyebrows for PMU: Tips & Tools

By Emily M.| Last updated on December 22, 2022
How to Draw Symmetrical Eyebrows
⏱️ 4 min read

You’ve probably already heard a famous saying that eyebrows are sisters, not twins.

This means that they are usually not and shouldn’t be completely identical. All faces are asymmetrical to a certain extent, but the more symmetrical the features are, the more attractive the face is perceived to be.

So that’s why people tend to ask for symmetrical eyebrows when they decide to get their brows tattooed. Let’s find out whether you should, and how to achieve, symmetrical eyebrows.

Why Are Symmetrical Eyebrows So Important?

As explained in the introduction, symmetry is perceived as beautiful. Symmetrical eyebrows will balance the face and make it look more attractive.

Of course, that doesn’t mean that you, as a permanent makeup artist, should strive for perfect symmetry. With some clients, it will be easy to achieve, while with others, it can look unnatural because too many adjustments have to be made.

symmetrical eyebrows importance
Image source: Instagram @beautyslesh

So, How to Draw Symmetrical Eyebrows for PMU?

Okay, so now we are talking mapping. There are different tools eyebrow tattoo artists use for mapping but the most commonly used ones are mapping string, sticky brow rulers, and a compass.

Let’s explain them one by one.

Drawing Symmetrical Eyebrows with a Mapping String

Mapping string is the ultimate tool eyebrow tattoo artists use to get perfectly symmetrical eyebrows. They usually come packaged pre-inked with charcoal or cosmetic ink.

So, to create the perfect outline with a mapping string, start by finding the center of the face.

Don’t go from the tip of the nose, but run the string from the middle of the chin, over the middle of the lips and the root of the nose, because the nose of the clients may not be perfectly straight.

Now decide where each eyebrow is going to start. The beginning of the brow has to be in line with the inner corner of the eye. You can use a caliper to check whether the distance between the central line and the beginning of each brow is equal.

To find the arch, make a vertical line in line with the outer part of the iris. Then use a caliper to check the distance and transfer it to the other brow.

Use the outer corner of the nose aligned with the outer corner of the eye to find how long the eyebrow should be. Make sure the client agrees with that. If they want to go shorter or longer, make adjustments or explain to them why you think the length you chose is right.

When you finish with one brow, use the string to create straight horizontal lines towards the other brows, and you’ll see where the arch of the other brow should be.

The arches of natural brows are usually not at the same height. That’s why mapping is such an essential part of the eyebrow tattoo process.

Drawing Symmetrical Eyebrows with a Sticky Ruler

A disposable sticky ruler is another useful tool permanent makeup artists use to create a perfect outline. A sticky ruler is placed above the eyebrows. It’s important to find the middle of the face.

To find the beginning of the brow, do the same as with the mapping string. You can use a paper of a sticky ruler to help you with this.

The beginning of the brow should be in line with the inner corner of the eye.

When you align the side of the nose with the iris, that’s where the arch is.

You’ll get the length of the brow by aligning the side of the nose and the outer corner of the eye.

To create eyebrows symmetry, whatever you do on one side, mimic on the other.

Drawing Symmetrical Eyebrows with a Sticky Ruler
Image source: Instagram @aloorbeaute

Other Useful Tricks for Checking the Symmetry of the Eyebrows

After you map out the eyebrows, always make the client sit up, to check whether your mapping is right. The position of the bones and muscles of the face is not the same when the person is sitting or when they’re lying.

If you are a beginner at this, it’s even better to have the client sitting through the whole mapping process.

If you are a beginner, use whatever can help you to make your mapping on point. Different mobile apps can help you achieve symmetry and check whether the brows are as similar as possible, whether the arches are in the same place and whether the length is equal.

Make sure your client is relaxed. If the client is nervous (most of them are when they come for the appointment) they overactive their muscles. They tend to lift one eyebrow, so make sure their face is relaxed for the mapping.

Useful Tools for Achieving Symmetrical Eyebrows

Here are some of our tool recommendations for the perfect mapping results.

Should I Strive for Perfect Eyebrows Symmetry at All Costs?

Of course not. Sometimes perfectly symmetrical eyebrows can look weird on a face that is extremely asymmetrical.

For instance, if the space between one eye and the eyebrow is much bigger than the space between the other eye and its eyebrow, it can look unnatural.

Experienced PMU artists try to make the eyebrows parallel to the ground to achieve perfect symmetry. In most cases, this will work, but of course, there are always exceptions.

If the face is noticeably asymmetrical, then the brows should be balanced according to other things.

First, use the eyes as your guide. The brows should be parallel to the eyes to frame them better.

Also, when you work with asymmetrical brows and you need to remove a lot of natural hair from one brow and add a lot of tattooed strokes, in order to make them as symmetrical as possible, that is not going to look natural.

The eyebrow needs to sit on the brow bone, not on the forehead. And if you remove a lot of brow hair from one brow, the client will have to pluck that brow again and again, which is annoying.

Conclusion

As a permanent makeup artist, you shouldn’t strive for perfectly symmetrical eyebrows at all costs. Find ways to improve your mapping but if you are working with a very asymmetrical face, do what makes more sense and don’t go for perfect symmetry.

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